Friday, January 6, 2017

Instant Pot Borsch

My day started out on not the best note with having my email hacked first thing in the morning. Apparently 1 in 4 accounts get hacked nowadays. Bummer. Please accept my apologies if you have received an email from me. It wasn't me.
I'm trying to restore all the energy lost with a flavorful bowl of homemade Borsch. Here are the Instant Pot instructions in case you want to give it a try over the weekend. I also added Jerky Chews (as they rehydrate nicely) for a boost of extra protein.
For the broth:
1lb roasted grass-fed beef: stew meat and 2-3 marrow bones.
Jerky Chews for additional protein
1 medium onion, cut into quarters
1 rib of celery, chopped
1/2 tsp black pepper
salt to taste
2 bay leaves
water enough to cover the bones
Soup in a few separate steps:
3 medium beets, cut into quarters
1 large carrot, grated
1 large potato, peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces
1/2 head of small green cabbage, thinly sliced or shredded
juice of one lemon
Garnish:
fresh parsley or any other greens you like
coconut yogurt or sour cream if you can tolerate it.

Instructions:
1. Toss the meat and bones into the pot. Followed by the veggies to make broth. Fill the pot with enough water to cover the bones, but not go over the capacity of the pressure cooker.
2. Put the Instant Pot lid on and turn the vent valve to closed. Press "Soup" and use the manual button to bring the time up to 40 or for richer broth even 50.
3. Quick pressure release once the meat is done cooking. Take out the bones and meat, cut meat into bite-sized pieces, save for later. Toss the veggies. Scoop the scum.
4. Throw in just the beets and cook on "Soup" for another 15 minutes.
5. Quick pressure release once beets are cooked, take out and grade.
6. Now throw in potato and carrot, cook on "Soup" for 7 minutes.
7. Quick pressure release and press "Keep Warm." Add back the shredded beets and pieces of meat, and bag of Jerky Chews if you like.
8. Throw in raw sliced cabbage and cover the lid, let it simmer in already hot soup for 5 minutes to a crunchy consistency. Check several times through out to ensure that the cabbage does not become overcooked.
9. Add juice of one lemon, salt and pepper if it needs more.

Enjoy! My family's favorite way to eat Borsch.

Monday, October 31, 2016

Speedy Chicken Broth

It's finally cooling down and I am starting to crave chicken broth.
Instead of waiting 6+ hours to prepared using a slow, I switched to making it in the Instant Pot on the pressure cooker option. Time saved and so easy.

I start by gathering chicken leftovers over a couple of days (usually takes my family about 3).
I empty all the leftovers into the pot, fill about 3/4 with water.
1 tsp Real Salt (the salt used in Jerky Chews)
1 tbls Apple Cider Vineger
A few stalks of celery cut into 3-4 pieces each
3 carrots cut into large pieces
Onion cut in large pieces
A few cloves of garlic whole and unpeeled
A bit of parsley and dill

I put the Instant Pot on high pressure for 2 hours, then let it stand closed for about 30 min before I let the steam out.

Perfect healthy and delicious bone broth!


Saturday, October 29, 2016

Easy Paleo Tortillas from SEP

I usually don't indulge in Paleofied food but once in a while I spoil my family. Recently I tried a recipe from Stupid Easy Paleo. I made the sweetened version and added the vanilla extract, I also doubled the recipe as my family devours these crepes/tortillas.


Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Sugar changes the brain

Consuming a high sugar diet changes the brain and leads to inflammation. Something that's been known for a while and why I was so dedicated to starting a beef jerky company that didn't included it in the ingredients.
I always recommend trying The 21-Day Sugar Detox to really understand what impact sugar has on the body and how to make a change for the better in your life.
"Perhaps it has nothing to do with will, and a lot to do with biochemistry," she says. Just as scientists in the last century showed there was a link between smoking and lung cancer, Dus thinks she can find a link between an early exposure to a diet high in sugar and obesity."

Read more: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/04/496560373/this-scientist-is-trying-to-unravel-what-sugar-does-to-the-brain 


Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Big Food Companies Can End Obesity

"But what a lot of foodies really want is to ban the food industry from selling junk food altogether. And that is just a fantasy." 

There is no doubt that big food companies are profit-driven and have done their share of harm by contaminating the food supply with highly addictive processed foods. But given their huge market reach, even the minor improvements in their offerings are making a difference and could possibly end obesity one day. When the public has the education and motivation to spend on healthy foods, big food companies like General Mills and multinational corporations like McDonald's will have no choice but to come around with better food options. They have already re-worked ingredients and menus to be more "healthy," and even if it's purely profit-motivated, their demographic of buyers are benefiting regardless. Demand for healthier food options is proving to be highly effective at bringing about change and there is always room to lobby further. 

"In fact, these roundly demonized companies could do far more for the public’s health in five years than the wholesome-food movement is likely to accomplish in the next 50. But will the wholesome-food advocates let them?"

Read more: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/07/how-junk-food-can-end-obesity/309396/?utm_source=atlfb

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Only 1.5% of Americans eat an optimal diet

Isn't that headline absolutely alarming? Subsidies for big agriculture and the food industry are responsible for this. Agribusiness is mass-producing cheap food at the cost of human, animal, and environmental health and all for the sake of profit!
'According to a study published Tuesday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, more than half the calories Americans consumed between 2001 and 2006 came from subsidized crops like corn, wheat, soy, and rice. While these are admittedly staple crops, which by both definition and nutritional makeup are a major component of diets, the researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the high rates of consumption of subsidized crops are associated with “adverse cardiometabolic risk” among adults.'

Read more: http://www.takepart.com/article/2016/07/06/crop-subsidies-health?cmpid=tp-ptnr-nourishedkitchen

I first learned about agricultural subsidies from reading The Omnivore’s Dilemma at age 21 during my college days in NYC. It was eye-opening and jump started my desire to buy my produce from local farms. I based my entire college senior thesis on a way to make even the food from the local Union Square Farmers Market more accessible on college campus, where vending machines packed with cheap processed food are on every floor. I was determined to bring awareness to how subsidies for big agriculture and the food industry are making us sick and be part of creating a healthier and environmentally-friendly world.
Just a few years later, that same passion is what inspired me to launch a 'clean label' beef jerky product with emphasis on using 100% grass-fed beef and supporting sustainable practices. It's been quite a rewarding journey, but often overcome with so much doubt.
Small food businesses really need your support to continue offering healthier and more sustainable alternatives packed with nutritional value. If you got a farmers market nearby, make sure to visit! And if you're craving a protein snack made (by hand in small batches in the US) using simple quality ingredients, stop by our online store today!

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Study shows memory loss from Alzheimer's disease can be reversed

Having been personally affected by a family member who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, this small study brings me hope. There is some data to show that memory loss in patients can be reversed and improvement maintained. What caught my attention is not a one-size-fits-all prescription was used for everyone - very different to what we are used to seeing with the medical establishment. 
"Publishing their results in the journal Aging, the team hasn't gone into much detail about how MEND works, probably because each treatment involves a complex combination of factors that has been specifically designed to treat just one individual, as each person's version of Alzheimer's appears to be different."